Sajid Javid becomes the first member of an ethnic minority to be Home Secretary Breaking News

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Sajid Javid becomes the first member of an ethnic minority to be Home Secretary Breaking News

Sajid Javid's (pictured leaving No 10 today) meteoric rise through British politics propelled him to the Home Office today as the first member of an ethnic minority to hold a Great Office of State

Sajid Javid's (pictured leaving No 10 today) meteoric rise through British politics propelled him to the Home Office today as the first member of an ethnic minority to hold a Great Office of State

Sajid Javid’s (pictured leaving No 10 today) meteoric rise through British politics propelled him to the Home Office today as the first member of an ethnic minority to hold a Great Office of State

Sajid Javid’s meteoric rise through British politics propelled him to the Home Office today as the first member of an ethnic minority to hold a Great Office of State. 

A son of a bus driver, the new Home Secretary, 48, has said he is from Muslim heritage but that he does not practice any faith.

Mr Javid, whose parents came to Britain from Pakistan in the 1960s, had appeared to audition for his new post yesterday.

The minister, a married father of four, said was ‘really concerned’ when he heard the accounts of those caught up in the fiasco emerge.

But he pleaded with voters not to punish the Tories in local elections this week for the scandal, insisting the Government is cleaning up the mess – a mess now at the top of his own in-tray. 

He told the Sunday Telegraph: ‘It immediately impacted me. I’m a ­second-generation migrant. My parents came to this country from Pakistan, just like the Windrush generation.

‘They came to this country after the Second World War to help rebuild it, they came from Commonwealth countries, they were asked to come in to [do] work that some people would describe as unattractive – my dad worked in a cotton mill, he worked as a bus driver.

‘When I heard about the Windrush ­issue I thought, That could be my mum … it could be my dad … it could be my uncle … it could be me.’ 

The new Home Secretary first entered politics in 2010 as the MP for Bromsgrove. He lives with his wife Laura and their four children in Fulham.

Despite his rapid rise through the political ranks, Mr Javid has fiercely guarded time with his three daughters and one son.

Aides told BuzzFeed in 2015 how he often arrived on Monday morning bursting with stories from the weekend – memorably recalling a heroic rescue of the family hamster by placing foil strips around the house and staying up all night listening for rustling.

As he arrived at the Home Office today, Mr Javid reflected on how proud his family would be – and promised to phone his mum later.

He said: ‘My parents came to our great country in the 60s,’ he said. ‘They came from Pakistan to help build this country.

‘I think for them to see one of their sons rise to this great office of state, I’m sure they will be very proud.

‘But I haven’t called my mum yet but I will do later.’ 

The new Home Secretary first entered politics in 2010 as the MP for Bromsgrove. He lives with his wife Laura (pictured together last year) and their four children in Fulham

The new Home Secretary first entered politics in 2010 as the MP for Bromsgrove. He lives with his wife Laura (pictured together last year) and their four children in Fulham

The new Home Secretary first entered politics in 2010 as the MP for Bromsgrove. He lives with his wife Laura (pictured together last year) and their four children in Fulham

Mr Javid (pictured arriving at the Home Office today) faces a packed in-tray of dealing with the Windrush debacle and drawing up a post-Brexit immigration policy 

Mr Javid (pictured arriving at the Home Office today) faces a packed in-tray of dealing with the Windrush debacle and drawing up a post-Brexit immigration policy 

Mr Javid (pictured arriving at the Home Office today) faces a packed in-tray of dealing with the Windrush debacle and drawing up a post-Brexit immigration policy 

A son of a bus driver, the new Home Secretary (pictured at Tory conference last year) has said he is from Muslim heritage but that he does not practice any faith

A son of a bus driver, the new Home Secretary (pictured at Tory conference last year) has said he is from Muslim heritage but that he does not practice any faith

A son of a bus driver, the new Home Secretary (pictured at Tory conference last year) has said he is from Muslim heritage but that he does not practice any faith

Ahead of his first election to Parliament, he told a hustings his family’s heritage was Muslim but that he did not practice any faith – adding ‘we should recognise that Christianity is the religion of our country’.

He was installed in David Cameron’s Government in just over two years as junior Treasury minister, enjoying a rapid promotion to City Minister in October 2013. 

Mr Javid was promoted to the Cabinet in April 2014 when Mr Cameron made him Culture Secretary. He rose again to Business Secretary after the 2015 election.

After his promotion to the Cabinet, Mr Javid struck a tough tone on immigration.

He told the Telegraph in 2014: ‘People want Britain to have more control over its borders, and I think they are right.

‘People also say, when immigrants do come to Britain, that they should come to work, and make a contribution and that they should also respect our way of life, and I agree with all of that.

‘It means things like trying to learn English.’

Mr Javid (pictured meeting the Queen in 2015) has enjoyed a meteoric rise through the ranks, becoming the first of new MPs elected in 2010 to reach the Cabinet 

Mr Javid (pictured meeting the Queen in 2015) has enjoyed a meteoric rise through the ranks, becoming the first of new MPs elected in 2010 to reach the Cabinet 

Mr Javid (pictured meeting the Queen in 2015) has enjoyed a meteoric rise through the ranks, becoming the first of new MPs elected in 2010 to reach the Cabinet 

As Business Secretary, Mr Javid was a major player in the Cameron Government's push to build ties with China (he is pictured in 2015 signing an agreement with his counterpart and President Xi) 

As Business Secretary, Mr Javid was a major player in the Cameron Government's push to build ties with China (he is pictured in 2015 signing an agreement with his counterpart and President Xi) 

As Business Secretary, Mr Javid was a major player in the Cameron Government’s push to build ties with China (he is pictured in 2015 signing an agreement with his counterpart and President Xi) 

A reluctant Remainer, Mr Javid toed Mr Cameron’s line at the EU referendum – warning a Brexit vote would mean a lost decade for British business.

After the vote was declared, he embraced the result and has been a strong supporter of Theresa May’s Brexit strategy – despite the pair clashing in the past.  

The arrival of Mrs May in Downing Street saw Mr Javid tasked with overhauling Britain’s housing sector as Communities Secretary.

A post-election reshuffle saw his post expanded into a Housing Ministry.  

Before entering politics, Mr Javid worked in banking in London, New York and Singapore. 

Mr Javid (pictured campaigning with Zac Goldsmith in 2016), whose parents came to Britain from Pakistan in the 1960s, had appeared to audition for his new post yesterday

Mr Javid (pictured campaigning with Zac Goldsmith in 2016), whose parents came to Britain from Pakistan in the 1960s, had appeared to audition for his new post yesterday

Mr Javid (pictured campaigning with Zac Goldsmith in 2016), whose parents came to Britain from Pakistan in the 1960s, had appeared to audition for his new post yesterday

The minister (pictured with Patrick McLoughlin, left, and Andrew Feldman, right, in 2015)  a married father of four, said was 'really concerned' when he heard the accounts of those caught up in the fiasco emerge.

The minister (pictured with Patrick McLoughlin, left, and Andrew Feldman, right, in 2015)  a married father of four, said was 'really concerned' when he heard the accounts of those caught up in the fiasco emerge.

The minister (pictured with Patrick McLoughlin, left, and Andrew Feldman, right, in 2015)  a married father of four, said was ‘really concerned’ when he heard the accounts of those caught up in the fiasco emerge.

He rose to join Deutsche Bank’s board after running the bank’s credit trading, equity convertibles, commodities and private equity businesses in Asia – earning an estimated £3million a year. 

Speaking to yesterday’s Sunday Telegraph, Mr Javid appeared to audition for his new job with an emotional plea to his own party on the Windrush scandal.

He said: ‘I was really concerned when I first started hearing and reading about some of the issues.

‘It immediately impacted me. I’m a ­second-generation migrant. My parents came to this country from Pakistan, just like the Windrush generation.

‘They came to this country after the Second World War to help rebuild it, they came from Commonwealth countries, they were asked to come in to [do] work that some people would describe as unattractive – my dad worked in a cotton mill, he worked as a bus driver.

‘When I heard about the Windrush ­issue I thought, That could be my mum … it could be my dad … it could be my uncle … it could be me.’ 

WHAT ARE THE KEY PRIORITIES FOR HOME SECRETARY JAVID?

The Windrush fallout

The scandal that set in train the events that ultimately resulted in Ms Rudd’s departure is far from resolved. Officials are working through hundreds of cases reported to a dedicated helpline, with the number of potential Windrush cases standing at more than 1,300 last week. The next Home Secretary will also have to oversee the compensation and citizenship schemes announced for those affected by the scandal.

The ‘hostile environment’

Measures to crack down on illegal immigration have come under sharp focus and calls for the policy to be disbanded are unlikely to subside after Ms Rudd’s resignation. Her successor will also doubtless face questions over the department’s targets culture, in particular in the area of immigration.

Brexit

Recent events have prompted fresh questions over the Home Office’s capacity to manage the vast bureaucratic exercise associated with Britain’s departure from the EU. Later this year the process of assigning status to more than three million EU nationals living in the UK will begin, while the department will be responsible for implementing whatever new immigration system is brought in after the end of the implementation period in 2020.

Crime

Before the furore over Windrush and immigration targets erupted, the Home Office was already coming under mounting pressure after a spate of deadly violence in London. Figures released last week showed police in England and Wales registered rises in knife and gun crime last year. The new Home Secretary will inherit leadership of the Government’s strategy to tackle serious violence – the unveiling of which earlier this month was overshadowed by a fresh row over police officer numbers. 

Terrorism

The official threat level remains at severe, meaning an attack is ‘highly likely’. Britain was hit by five attacks last year and police and MI5 have around 23,000 individuals on their radar. An early task for Ms Rudd’s successor will be to finalise the Government’s refreshed counter-terror strategy, which is expected to be presented in the coming weeks.

 

Sajid Javid becomes the first member of an ethnic minority to be Home Secretary Breaking News

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Sajid Javid becomes the first member of an ethnic minority to be Home Secretary Breaking News

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